Praise What Comes

Praise What Comes

Unexpected Kiss, Marco Lazzarin image via Flickr CC license.
Unexpected Kiss, Marco Lazzarin image via Flickr CC license.

surprising as unplanned kisses, all you haven’t deserved
of days and solitude, your body’s immoderate good health
that lets you work in many kinds of weather. Praise

Image by Indi Samarajiva via Flickr CC license
Image by Indi Samarajiva via Flickr CC license

talk with just about anyone. And quiet intervals, books
that are your food and your hunger; nightfall and walks before sleep. Praising these for practice, perhaps

you will come at last to praise grief and the wrongs
you never intended. At the end there may be no answers
and only a few very simple questions: did I love,

finish my task in the world? Learn at least one
of the many names of God? At the intersections,
the boundaries where one life began and another

ended, the jumping-off places between fear and
possibility, at the ragged edges of pain,
did I catch the smallest glimpse of the holy?

~ Jeanne Lohmann ~

The poem comes from Jeanne Lohmann’s 2003 collection, “The Light of Invisible Bodies.”  This remarkable woman recently celebrated her 90th birthday AND published her 10th collection of poems.

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Published by

quirkyjazz

I am a pianist, musician, music teacher, choir director, mother, wife, daughter, sister, cousin, sister-in-law, friend, neighbor. I enjoy music (of course!), quilting, sewing, beading, traveling, kayaking, camping, biking, hiking, gardening, knitting, scrapbooking, cooking, reading, poetry, drinking good coffee, and having fun with family and friends. NOTE -- Creative Commons License: All work of The Tromp Queen (quirkyjazz, aka Jill) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 Unported License.

2 thoughts on “Praise What Comes”

    1. It is deep-digging poem, soul-wise. There is much to ponder here. “Praising these (simple joys easily overlooked or taken for granted) for practice” — that is exactly what I’ve been attempting to do with my Joy 365 project. The last half of the poem consists solely of those three haunting questions so beautifully constructed! I intend to find more of this woman’s poems.

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