Rest and Be Thankful

Rest and Be Thankful:  Somewhere in Scotland

Image of Rest and Be Thankful by mike138, via Flickr CC License.
Image of Rest and Be Thankful by mike138, via Flickr CC License.

A place to linger with a spectacular view!

Running up Glen Croe, the road crosses and re-crosses the river in the crag-confined floor of the glen before climbing steadily up the valley flank to its head on the pass between Loch Long and Loch Fyne.

Image of Rest and Be Thankful Argyll Forest Park sign by Steve Zerr, via Flickr CC license.
Image of Rest and Be Thankful Argyll Forest Park sign by Steve Zerr, via Flickr CC license.

Here in the pass is Rest and Be Thankful, at 246m (800ft) where one can stop to enjoy the excellent views of the surrounding countryside and well, rest and be thankful.  For part of the way, the road follows the line of the military road built in 1753: the soldiers who built it gave the pass its name.

Rest and Be Thankful, Argyll and Bute. Image by JD Mathewson, via Flickr CC license
Rest and Be Thankful, Argyll and Bute. Image by JD Mathewson, via Flickr CC license

The ‘Rest’, as it is often called, is a vital travel link for much of mid and south Argyll; it is a way stop for travelers going through to the old county town of Inveraray.

In early days visitors held the area in a kind of fearful awe. Sarah Murray, a bold English traveller from 1799, thought it was “one of the most formidable, as well as most gloomy passes in the Highlands, amongst such black, bare, craggy, tremendous mountains, as must shake the nerves of every timorous person.”

A new road took the terror out of the glen, though landslides from the unstable slopes above frequently occur and can sometimes block the road.

Image of Rest and Be Thankful area by Marc via Flickr CC license.
Image of Rest and Be Thankful area by Marc via Flickr CC license.

A marker stone records the history of the pass at the bottom of the car park, just where the old road comes in. (photo below)  Rest & Be Thankful are the words which are located on this stone near the junction of the A83 and the B828.  A stone was placed there by soldiers who built the original road in 1753, and the road has been known by the same name for centuries. The original stone fell into ruin and was replaced by a commemorative stone on the same site.

CC found through http://www.arrocharheritage.com/HistoryOfRABT.htm
Memorial stone to original road builders, from Jim’s gallery on Picasa.

The inscription on the stone reads:

REST & BE THANKFUL
MILITARY ROAD REPD
BY 93D REGT 1768
TRANSFERRED TO
COMMRS FOR H.R & C.
IN THE YEAR 1814

To find out the complete history of this wonderful spot, plus anecdotes and several photos — follow this link.

To find out more about the Scotland Forestry Park and Rest and Be Thankful in particular — follow this link.

Easan Dubh waterfall near Rest and Be Thankful, image by Tim Haynes via Flickr CC license
Easan Dubh waterfall near Rest and Be Thankful, image by Tim Haynes via Flickr CC license

If you plan to go:

From Glasgow, follow the A82 along Loch Lomond. Then follow the A83 towards Oban, Inveraray and Dunoon. The car park is at grid reference NN 229 074.

G83 7AS is the nearest postcode, a little way down the hill towards Arrochar.

Image of Rest and Be Thankful area by Steven Feather (tubblesnap) via Flickr CC license.
Image of Rest and Be Thankful area by Steven Feather (tubblesnap) via Flickr CC license.

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Note from The Tromp Queen:

This topic idea has been languishing in my Drafts for a more than a year.  I think I stumbled upon this idyllic little slice of the world when I was searching for a photo to represent “rest” or “being thankful.”  I search Flickr and the Creative Commons photos using those words and this small roadside park kept popping up.  It looks like such a lovely place; I’d love to visit it sometime.  Whether or not I ever get there, it is good to know there is a place in the world called “Rest and Be Thankful.”  Hopefully people do that there every single day, and may we all take the inspiration to rest and be thankful where we are in our lives every day.

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Published by

quirkyjazz

I am a pianist, musician, music teacher, choir director, mother, wife, daughter, sister, cousin, sister-in-law, friend, neighbor. I enjoy music (of course!), quilting, sewing, beading, traveling, kayaking, camping, biking, hiking, gardening, knitting, scrapbooking, cooking, reading, poetry, drinking good coffee, and having fun with family and friends. NOTE -- Creative Commons License: All work of The Tromp Queen (quirkyjazz, aka Jill) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 Unported License.

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