FREE great stuff online! (FREE!)

Georgia O’Keeffe It Was Blue and Green

I just discovered a very comprehensive, interesting and best of all FREE online resource:  

Open Culture — The best free cultural and educational media on the web.

Free Art & Images

Leonard Bernstein at the piano, wikipedia image
Leonard Bernstein at the piano, wikipedia image

Great Lectures

Image by Indi Samarajiva via Flickr CC license
Image by Indi Samarajiva via Flickr CC license

Syllabi

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Book Lists By

  • There is no excuse for boredom from now on.  You’re welcome.  

    (I apologize for the odd formatting quirks in this post.  I did my best, but with the copying and pasting from the Open Culture webpage there seemed to be a lot of phantom issues I could not solve).

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Norma says

by quirkyjazz
by quirkyjazz

My dear mom is here for a several week visit.  She came to see my daughter graduate from 8th grade.  She also got to see my son perform a piano solo he composed at the HS Pops Concert.  She is staying to help us with the pre-move pre-house listing cleaning and sorting (and laundry — she LOVES to do laundry!  Hallelujah!).

Anyway.

My mom has a very colorful vocabulary.  Not in the way you might be thinking.  Not swear words.  Just odd phrases and words that most people don’t use.

For instance, just today she has said all of the following:

I went lickety-kalarp.  (quickly)  Lickety-split is another variant of lickety-kalarp.

I thought heck fire.  (self explanatory)

I’m coming with my canarvous.  (large bulky object)

I like pennies.  (random observation)

Other eloquent phrases she often says:

Land-o-Goshen!  (Used as an exclamation.  My darling daughter thought she was saying “Atlantic Ocean” and could never quite figure out what Grandma meant by it!)

It’s leaning toward Kelso.  (This means something that is leaning, or just not standing up straight.  We discovered a very old map of the county where she grew up in Indiana and there was indeed a town named Kelso that was several miles north of her town.)

It’s sigh-whicker-jawed.  (crooked)

Since I was knee high to a grasshopper. (very young)

We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.  (Granted, this one isn’t that odd, but she says it a lot!).

Once in a blue moon.  (This one isn’t that odd, either.  It means rarely).

It’s harder than a dornick (a stone small enough to throw; also a large piece of rock).  Or the word could possibly be Darnick (the home village of a family of Scottish stone masons and builders).

I’ll take a snort, shake, dab (choose any one) of that.  (Meaning I’ll take a little bit, a bite or a taste).

by quirkyjazz
by quirkyjazz